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The New World Shopping Mall has been abandoned since 1999. It shut its doors after being condemned by local regulators. A few years later a massive fire destroyed the structure’s roof. Not long after that monsoon rains flooded the lower floors.

As a way to combat the spread of mosquitoes and other insects breeding in the stagnant water, locals introduced koi and catfish to the former mall. Not only did the fish take care of the pest problem, they’ve thrived. It is now one of the world’s largest urban ponds.

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colossalmedia:

After ten years of painting large-scale advertisements and art projects on behalf of our clients, we decided it was time to create our own. The Big Brush Project is a new public art initiative from Colossal Media meant to showcase who we are and what we stand for. It is a chance to collaborate with some of our favorite artists and highlight an art form that brings color to our daily surroundings.
The Canvas. Between existing inventory and custom acquisition, we have access to a large variety of iconic and untapped wallscapes. Each wall location creates an opportunity to say something unique and enliven a neighborhood with fresh, powerful artwork. The Big Brush Project uses the artist community to provide the creative inspiration; Colossal Media then brings the canvas and the skillset to see it brought to life in the local outdoor landscape.
The Content. For the 1st Big Brush Project we chose two Williamsburg Brooklyn walls and teamed up with Greg Lamarche, an NYC-based artist known for his typography and collages. Process plays a major role in both art forms; in fact we believe that process is as important as the art itself. Greg’s technique of hand-cutting found letters was a perfect compliment to the precision-based, hand-paint production method.
Installation 1. A giant wall at Bedford & Broadway set the stage for the first piece. This location, a long time member of our art wall inventory, was chosen for its iconic backdrop of the Williamsburg Bridge and its highly trafficked, centralized location in an evolving, creatively driven Williamsburg Brooklyn. For this project we stepped away from our standard execution methods most commonly used on a conventional campaign. Instead of working in sections, each letter was painted individually to put emphasis on Greg’s letter-by-letter hand-cut collage approach. Every step of the project was captured in a stop motion log and culminated with short video directed by William Reddington. This video is an extension of The Big Brush Project that allows the paintings an even wider reach, and a story that can live on visually and be experienced virally for years to come.
Installation 2. The second piece came to life on one of our conventional advertising sign spaces, also located in Williamsburg, on a once industrial block now heralded as the new creative hub of New York. Greg again created a customized art piece, this time choosing a recurring, ultra colorful, text based theme reading Sky High Murals— effectively creating an artistic landmark and bringing both of our signatures to the project. This piece speaks greatly to the evolution of this community, the art world, and the hand-paint story.
Stay tuned for the next installment of The Big Brush Project coming Fall 2013.
———————— 
Greg Lamarche is an NYC-based artist who creates hand-cut collages out of found vintage printed matter. He began writing graffiti in 1981 and published the seminal graffiti magazine Skills in the early 1990’s. He has worked as both a fine artist and graphic designer since 2000, and has been featured in numerous publications including the New York Times, Modern Painters, Print, Arkitip and Juxtapoz among others. www.greglamarche.com


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Zoom Info
colossalmedia:

After ten years of painting large-scale advertisements and art projects on behalf of our clients, we decided it was time to create our own. The Big Brush Project is a new public art initiative from Colossal Media meant to showcase who we are and what we stand for. It is a chance to collaborate with some of our favorite artists and highlight an art form that brings color to our daily surroundings.
The Canvas. Between existing inventory and custom acquisition, we have access to a large variety of iconic and untapped wallscapes. Each wall location creates an opportunity to say something unique and enliven a neighborhood with fresh, powerful artwork. The Big Brush Project uses the artist community to provide the creative inspiration; Colossal Media then brings the canvas and the skillset to see it brought to life in the local outdoor landscape.
The Content. For the 1st Big Brush Project we chose two Williamsburg Brooklyn walls and teamed up with Greg Lamarche, an NYC-based artist known for his typography and collages. Process plays a major role in both art forms; in fact we believe that process is as important as the art itself. Greg’s technique of hand-cutting found letters was a perfect compliment to the precision-based, hand-paint production method.
Installation 1. A giant wall at Bedford & Broadway set the stage for the first piece. This location, a long time member of our art wall inventory, was chosen for its iconic backdrop of the Williamsburg Bridge and its highly trafficked, centralized location in an evolving, creatively driven Williamsburg Brooklyn. For this project we stepped away from our standard execution methods most commonly used on a conventional campaign. Instead of working in sections, each letter was painted individually to put emphasis on Greg’s letter-by-letter hand-cut collage approach. Every step of the project was captured in a stop motion log and culminated with short video directed by William Reddington. This video is an extension of The Big Brush Project that allows the paintings an even wider reach, and a story that can live on visually and be experienced virally for years to come.
Installation 2. The second piece came to life on one of our conventional advertising sign spaces, also located in Williamsburg, on a once industrial block now heralded as the new creative hub of New York. Greg again created a customized art piece, this time choosing a recurring, ultra colorful, text based theme reading Sky High Murals— effectively creating an artistic landmark and bringing both of our signatures to the project. This piece speaks greatly to the evolution of this community, the art world, and the hand-paint story.
Stay tuned for the next installment of The Big Brush Project coming Fall 2013.
———————— 
Greg Lamarche is an NYC-based artist who creates hand-cut collages out of found vintage printed matter. He began writing graffiti in 1981 and published the seminal graffiti magazine Skills in the early 1990’s. He has worked as both a fine artist and graphic designer since 2000, and has been featured in numerous publications including the New York Times, Modern Painters, Print, Arkitip and Juxtapoz among others. www.greglamarche.com


Cool
Zoom Info

colossalmedia:

After ten years of painting large-scale advertisements and art projects on behalf of our clients, we decided it was time to create our own. The Big Brush Project is a new public art initiative from Colossal Media meant to showcase who we are and what we stand for. It is a chance to collaborate with some of our favorite artists and highlight an art form that brings color to our daily surroundings.

The Canvas. Between existing inventory and custom acquisition, we have access to a large variety of iconic and untapped wallscapes. Each wall location creates an opportunity to say something unique and enliven a neighborhood with fresh, powerful artwork. The Big Brush Project uses the artist community to provide the creative inspiration; Colossal Media then brings the canvas and the skillset to see it brought to life in the local outdoor landscape.

The Content. For the 1st Big Brush Project we chose two Williamsburg Brooklyn walls and teamed up with Greg Lamarche, an NYC-based artist known for his typography and collages. Process plays a major role in both art forms; in fact we believe that process is as important as the art itself. Greg’s technique of hand-cutting found letters was a perfect compliment to the precision-based, hand-paint production method.

Installation 1. A giant wall at Bedford & Broadway set the stage for the first piece. This location, a long time member of our art wall inventory, was chosen for its iconic backdrop of the Williamsburg Bridge and its highly trafficked, centralized location in an evolving, creatively driven Williamsburg Brooklyn. For this project we stepped away from our standard execution methods most commonly used on a conventional campaign. Instead of working in sections, each letter was painted individually to put emphasis on Greg’s letter-by-letter hand-cut collage approach. Every step of the project was captured in a stop motion log and culminated with short video directed by William Reddington. This video is an extension of The Big Brush Project that allows the paintings an even wider reach, and a story that can live on visually and be experienced virally for years to come.

Installation 2. The second piece came to life on one of our conventional advertising sign spaces, also located in Williamsburg, on a once industrial block now heralded as the new creative hub of New York. Greg again created a customized art piece, this time choosing a recurring, ultra colorful, text based theme reading Sky High Murals— effectively creating an artistic landmark and bringing both of our signatures to the project. This piece speaks greatly to the evolution of this community, the art world, and the hand-paint story.

Stay tuned for the next installment of The Big Brush Project coming Fall 2013.

———————— 

Greg Lamarche is an NYC-based artist who creates hand-cut collages out of found vintage printed matter. He began writing graffiti in 1981 and published the seminal graffiti magazine Skills in the early 1990’s. He has worked as both a fine artist and graphic designer since 2000, and has been featured in numerous publications including the New York Times, Modern Painters, Print, Arkitip and Juxtapoz among others. www.greglamarche.com

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truebluemeandyou:

DIY 4 Ingredient Poison Apple Recipe from Simply Delicious Food. Apples, corn syrup, water, sugar and gel food coloring. I like this site because they have the best conversion site. For more unique Halloween party food go here.

I have never used gel food coloring.I usually use paste food coloring (never liquid) because it’s more vivid and lasts FOREVER. You can get it at Michaels using a coupon.

But here is Martha Stewart’s Foof Coloring 101

Liquid Gel

  • Liquid gel gives a deep, rich color without thinning and blends well. It is available online and in specialty stores.

Liquid

  • Liquid is the most familiar form of food coloring. It gives the weakest color compared to other types of food coloring and, because of its liquid consistency, it will thin out whatever it is being mixed with.

Gel-Paste

  • Gel-paste gives deeper, more vivid colors than gel or liquid. It is very concentrated and should be used in very small quantities.

Powdered Food Coloring

  • Powdered food coloring is very concentrated. It can be combined with sugar to decorate cookies, and with lemon extract to paint onto iced cookies (just roll cookies in it to color them).
Keep your thoughts positive because your thoughts become your words. Keep your words positive because your words become your behavior. Keep your behavior positive because your behavior becomes your habits. Keep your habits positive because your habits become your values. Keep your values positive because your values become your destiny.
Mahatma Gandhi  (via thatkindofwoman)

True

(Source: tanglejan)

We were grabbing a bite of lunch at a small cafe, in a mall, right across from a booth that sold jewelry and where ears could be pierced for a fee. A mother approaches with a little girl of six or seven years old. The little girl is clearly stating that she doesn’t want her ears pierced, that’s she’s afraid of how much it will hurt, that she doesn’t like earrings much in the first place. Her protests, her clear ‘no’ is simply not heard. The mother and two other women, who work the booth, begin chatting and trying to engage the little girl in picking out a pair of earrings. She has to wear a particular kind when the piercing is first done but she could pick out a fun pair for later.

"I don’t want my ears pierced."

"I don’t want any earrings."

The three adults glance at each other conspiratorially and now the pressure really begins. She will look so nice, all the other girls she knows wear earrings, the pain isn’t bad.

She, the child, sees what’s coming and starts crying. As the adults up the volume so does she, she’s crying and emitting a low wail at the same time. “I DON’T WANT MY EARS PIERCED.”

Her mother leans down and speaks to her, quietly but strongly, the only words we could hear were ‘… embarrassing me.’

We heard, then, two small screams, when the ears were pierced.

Little children learn early and often that ‘no doesn’t mean no.’

Little children learn early that no one will stand with them, even the two old men looking horrified at the events from the cafeteria.

Little girls learn early and often that their will is not their own.

No means no, yeah, right.

Most often, for kids and others without power, ”no means force.”

from "No Means Force" at Dave Hingsburger’s blog.

This is important. It doesn’t just apply to little girls and other children, though it often begins there.

For the marginalized, our “no’s” are discounted as frivolous protests, rebelliousness, or anger issues, or we don’t know what we’re talking about, or we don’t understand what’s happening.

When “no means force” we become afraid to say no.

(via k-pagination)

Powerful & true

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